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Pest categorisation of Arboridia kakogawana

on the Wiley Online Library

Metadata

Panel members at the time of adoption

Claude Bragard, Paula Baptista, Elisavet Chatzivassiliou, Francesco Di Serio, Paolo Gonthier, Josep Anton Jaques Miret, Annemarie Fejer Justesen, Alan MacLeod, Christer Sven Magnusson, Panagiotis Milonas, Juan A Navas‐Cortes, Stephen Parnell, Roel Potting, Philippe L Reignault, Emilio Stefani, Hans‐Hermann Thulke, Wopke Van der Werf, Antonio Vicent, Jonathan Yuen and Lucia Zappalà.

Abstract

The EFSA Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of the Japanese grape leafhopper, Arboridia kakogawana (Matsumura, 1932) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), for the EU territory. This species is not included in the EU Commission Implementing Regulation 2019/2072. Adults of A. kakogawana overwinter in broad‐leaved and mixed forests and move to vineyards in the spring where there may be up to four generations, before adults move back to forests during late summer–early autumn to overwinter, possibly under diapause. A. kakogawana has a restricted host range (Vitis spp. and Parthenocissus quinquefolia). It is native to Eastern Asia, from where it moved westwards reaching southern Russia in 1999, and subsequently Ukraine, Romania, Bulgaria and Serbia in 2020. A. kakogawana develops on the abaxial side of the leaves causing chlorotic spots that reduce grape quality. Plants for planting of Vitis L. are banned from entering the EU except from Switzerland, where A. kakogawana is not known to occur. Therefore, this can be considered as a closed entry pathway. However, other plants for planting including the host P. quinquefolia and many broad‐leaved trees where overwintering takes place, as well as isolated bark and wood with bark provide potential pathways which are partly regulated but remain open. There are no EU records of interception. Additional introductions and further spread of A. kakogawana into/within the EU, coupled with the ample availability of grapevines and the climatic conditions would most probably allow successful establishment in most EU member states. Should this happen, economic impact in table and wine grapes is anticipated. A. kakogawana satisfies all the criteria that are within the remit of EFSA to assess for it to be regarded as a potential Union quarantine pest (UQP).

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