Pest categorisation of Liriomyza sativae

Agromyzid, European Union, pest risk, plant health, plant pest, quarantine, cabbage leaf miner, vegetable leaf miner
First published in the EFSA Journal
9 mars 2020
Adopted
30 janvier 2020
Type
Scientific Opinion

Abstract

The EFSA Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of Liriomyza sativae (Diptera: Agromyzidae) for the EU. L. sativae (the cabbage or vegetable leaf miner; EPPO code: LIRISA) is a polyphagous pest native to the Americas which has spread to Africa, Asia and Oceania. L. sativae can have multiple overlapping generations per year. Eggs are inserted in the leaves of host plants. Three larval instars, which feed internally on field vegetables (leaves and stems), follow. Then, the larva jumps into the soil where a fourth larval instar occurs immediately before pupation, which takes place in the soil. L. sativae is regulated in the EU by Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2019/2072 (Annex IIA). Within this Regulation, import of soil or growing medium as such or attached to plants for planting from third countries other than Switzerland is regulated. Therefore, entry of L. sativae pupae is prevented. However, immature stages on plants for planting (excluding seeds) and fresh leafy hosts for consumption, cut branches, flowers and fruit with foliage provide potential pathways for entry into the EU. L. sativae has been repeatedly intercepted in the EU, especially in basil (Ocimum spp.). Climatic conditions and the wide availability of host plants provide conditions to support establishment in the EU, both in open fields and greenhouses. Impacts on field vegetables and ornamentals as well as hosts in greenhouses would be possible. Phytosanitary measures are available to reduce the likelihood of entry. L. sativae satisfies the criteria that are within the remit of EFSA to assess for it to be regarded as a potential Union quarantine pest. Although human‐assisted movement of vegetables is considered the main spread way for L. sativae, this agromyzid does not meet the criterion of occurring in the EU for it to be regarded as a potential Union regulated non‐quarantine pest.

Panel on Plant Health
Contact
alpha [at] efsa.europa.eu
doi
10.2903/j.efsa.2020.6037
EFSA Journal 2020;18(3):6037
Question Number
On request from
European Commission