Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to calcium-containing fruit juices and the reduction of tooth demineralisation pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

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Acknowledgements

The Panel wishes to thank the members of the Working Group on Claims: Carlo Agostoni, Jean-Louis Bresson, Susan Fairweather-Tait, Albert Flynn, Ines Golly, Marina Heinonen, Hannu Korhonen, Martinus Løvik, Ambroise Martin, Hildegard Przyrembel, Seppo Salminen, Yolanda Sanz, Sean (J.J.) Strain, Inge Tetens, Hendrik van Loveren and Hans Verhagen for the preparatory work on this scientific opinion.

Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies
EFSA Journal
EFSA Journal 2011;9(2):1983 [8 pp.].
doi
10.2903/j.efsa.2011.1983
Panel members at the time of adoption
Carlo Agostoni, Jean-Louis Bresson, Susan Fairweather-Tait, Albert Flynn, Ines Golly, Hannu Korhonen, Pagona Lagiou, Martinus Løvik, Rosangela Marchelli, Ambroise Martin, Bevan Moseley, Monika Neuhäuser-Berthold, Hildegard Przyrembel, Seppo Salminen, Yolanda Sanz, Sean (J.J.) Strain, Stephan Strobel, Inge Tetens, Daniel Tomé, Hendrik van Loveren and Hans Verhagen
Contact
Type
Opinion of the Scientific Committee/Scientific Panel
On request from
Competent Authority of the Netherlands following an application by FrieslandCampina
Question Number
EFSA-Q-2009-00501
Adopted
28 January 2011
Published
18 February 2011
Last Updated
16 March 2011. This version replaces the previous one/s.
Affiliation
European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy
Note
Abstract

Following an application from FrieslandCampina submitted pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of The Netherlands, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to acidic calcium-containing fruit juices and the reduction of tooth demineralisation. The scope of the application was proposed to fall under a health claim referring to reduction of disease risk. The Panel considers that the food, acidic calcium-containing fruit juices and comparative products, conventional fruit juices (not containing added calcium), are sufficiently characterised. The Panel considers that reducing tooth demineralisation resulting from erosive potential of a food is a beneficial physiological effect, provided that it is not accompanied by tooth demineralisation resulting from acid production in plaque through the fermentation of carbohydrates. A total of 37 pertinent studies were identified by the applicant, including observational studies, reviews, intervention studies on the erosive potential of fruit juices and other acidic drinks with and without added calcium in situ, in vitro studies on the erosive potential of acidic drinks with and without added calcium, and an animal study on the effect of calcium added to acidic drinks on dental erosion. The Panel notes that the potential of fruit juices with and without added calcium for demineralisation of dental enamel by acid production in plaque as a result of sugar fermentation was not assessed in any study. The Panel considers that the potential of fruit juices with and without added calcium for demineralisation of dental enamel, including the possible effects of both acids and sugars, has not been assessed appropriately. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of acidic calcium-containing fruit juices in replacement of fruit juice without added calcium and the reduction of tooth demineralisation.

Keywords
Calcium-containing fruit juices, tooth demineralisation, health claim
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Number of Pages
8