Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for carbohydrates and dietary fibre

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Article
Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies
EFSA Journal
EFSA Journal 2010; 8(3):1462 [77 pp.].
doi
10.2903/j.efsa.2010.1462
Panel members at the time of adoption
Carlo Agostoni, Jean-Louis Bresson, Susan Fairweather-Tait, Albert Flynn, Ines Golly, Hannu Korhonen, Pagona Lagiou, Martinus Løvik, Rosangela Marchelli, Ambroise Martin, Bevan Moseley, Monika Neuhäuser-Berthold, Hildegard Przyrembel, Seppo Salminen, Yolanda Sanz, Sean (J.J.) Strain, Stephan Strobel, Inge Tetens, Daniel Tomé, Hendrik van Loveren and Hans Verhagen.
Acknowledgements

The Panel wishes to thank for the preparation of this Opinion: Nils-Georg Asp, Wulf Becker, Henk van den Berg, Karin Hulshof, Albert Flynn, Ambroise Martin, Hildegard Przyrembel, Inge Tetens and EFSA’s staff member Silvia Valtueña Martínez.

Contact
Type
Opinion of the Scientific Committee/Scientific Panel
On request from
European Commission
Question Number
EFSA-Q-2008-467
Adopted
4 December 2009
Published
25 March 2010
Affiliation
European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy
Note
Download Article (1.89 MB)
Abstract

This Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA) deals with the establishment of Dietary Reference Values for carbohydrates and dietary fibre. Nutritionally, two broad categories of carbohydrates can be differentiated: “glycaemic carbohydrates”, i.e. carbohydrates digested and absorbed in the human small intestine, and ‘dietary fibre’, non-digestible carbohydrates passing to the large intestine. In this Opinion, dietary fibre is defined as non-digestible carbohydrates plus lignin. The absolute dietary requirement for glycaemic carbohydrates is not precisely known but will depend on the amount of fat and protein ingested. The Panel proposes 45 to 60 E% as the reference Intake range for carbohydrates applicable to both adults and children older than one year of age. Although high frequency of intake of sugar-containing foods can increase the risk of dental caries, there are insufficient data to set an upper limit for (added) sugar intake. Based on the available evidence on bowel function, the Panel considers dietary fibre intakes of 25 g/day to be adequate for normal laxation in adults. A fibre intake of 2 g/MJ is considered adequate for normal laxation in children from the age of one year. Although there is some experimental evidence that a reduction of the dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load may have favourable effects on some metabolic risk factors such as serum lipids, the evidence for a role in weight maintenance and prevention of diet-related diseases is inconclusive.

Summary

Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on Population Reference Intakes for the European population, including carbohydrates and dietary fibre.

Nutritionally, two broad categories of carbohydrates can be differentiated: “glycaemic carbohydrates”, i.e. carbohydrates digested and absorbed in the human small intestine, and “dietary fibre”, non-digestible carbohydrates passing to the large intestine.

The main glycaemic carbohydrates are monosaccharides, disaccharides, malto-oligosaccharides, and starch. In this Opinion the term “sugars” is used to cover monosaccharides and disaccharides. The term “added sugars” refers to sucrose, fructose, glucose, starch hydrolysates (glucose syrup, high-fructose syrup) and other isolated sugar preparations used as such or added during food preparation and manufacturing. Sugar alcohols (polyols) such as sorbitol, xylitol, mannitol, and lactitol, are usually not included in the term “sugars”. However, they are partly metabolised and included in “carbohydrates” according to the European legislation.

In this Opinion, dietary fibre is defined as non-digestible carbohydrates plus lignin, including non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) – cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, hydrocolloids (i.e., gums, mucilages, ß-glucans), resistant oligosaccharides – fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), other resistant oligosaccharides, resistant starch – consisting of physically enclosed starch, some types of raw starch granules, retrograded amylose, chemically and/or physically modified starches, and lignin associated with the dietary fibre polysaccharides.

Main dietary sources of sugars are fruits, berries, fruit juices, some vegetables, milk and milk products, and foods containing added sucrose and starch hydrolysates (e.g., glucose syrup, high-fructose syrup) such as carbonated beverages and sweets. Main dietary sources of starch are bread and other cereal products, potatoes, tubers and pulses.

Data from dietary surveys show that average carbohydrate intakes in European countries in children and adolescents varied between 43 to 58 E%, and from 38 to 56 E% in adults. Average intakes of sugars varied between 16 to 36 E% in children and adults.

Whole grain cereals, pulses, fruit, vegetables and potatoes are the main sources of dietary fibre. Average dietary fibre intakes varied from 10 to 20 g per day in young children (<10 to 12 years), from 15 to 30 g per day in adolescents, and from 16 to 29 g per day in adults. Average intakes of dietary fibre per MJ ranged from 1.7 to 2.5 g per MJ in (young) children and from 1.8 to 2.9 g per MJ in adults.

Total and glycemic carbohydrates

As energy balance is the ultimate goal, dietary reference values for carbohydrate intake cannot be made without considering other energy delivering macronutrients and will be given as percentage of total energy intake (E%). The absolute dietary requirement for glycaemic carbohydrates is not precisely known but will depend on the amount of fat and protein ingested. Generally, an intake of 50 to100 g per day will prevent ketosis. An intake of 130 g per day for both children (>1 year) and adults has been estimated to be sufficient to cover the needs of glucose for the brain. However, these levels of intake are not sufficient to meet energy needs in the context of acceptable intake levels of fat and protein.

Intervention studies provide evidence that high fat (>35 E%), low carbohydrate (<50 E%) diets are associated to adverse short- and long-term effects on body weight, although data are not sufficient to define a Lower Threshold of Intake (LTI) for carbohydrates. Similarly, high carbohydrate diets tend to induce adverse effects on the blood lipid profile, but there is an insufficient scientific basis for setting a Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for total carbohydrates. The Panel therefore comes to the conclusion that only a Reference Intake range can be given for total carbohydrate intake, partly based on practical considerations (e.g. current levels of intake, achievable dietary patterns).

Based on the above considerations the Panel proposes 45 to 60 E% as the Reference Intake range for carbohydrates. Diets with glycaemic carbohydrate contents of 45 to 60 E%, in combination with reduced intakes of fat and saturated fatty acids (SFA), are compatible with the improvement of metabolic risk factors for chronic disease, as well as with mean carbohydrate intakes observed in some European countries. This intake range applies to both adults and children older than one year of age.

Sugars

Frequent consumption of sugar-containing foods can increase risk of dental caries, especially when oral hygiene and fluoride prophylaxis are insufficient. However, available data do not allow the setting of an upper limit for intake of (added) sugars on the basis of a risk reduction for dental caries, as caries development related to consumption of sucrose and other cariogenic carbohydrates does not depend only on the amount of sugar consumed, but it is also influenced by frequency of consumption, oral hygiene, exposure to fluoride, and various other factors.

The evidence relating high intake of sugars (mainly as added sugars), compared to high intakes of starch, to weight gain is inconsistent for solid foods. However, there is some evidence that high intakes of sugars in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages might contribute to weight gain. The available evidence is insufficient to set an upper limit for intake of (added) sugars based on their effects on body weight.

Observed negative associations between added sugar intake and micronutrient density of the diet are mainly related to patterns of intake of the foods from which added sugars in the diet are derived rather than to intake of added sugars per se. The available data are not sufficient to set an upper limit for (added) sugar intake.

Although there is some evidence that high intakes (>20 E%) of sugars may increase serum triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol concentrations, and that >20 to 25 E% might adversely affect glucose and insulin response, the available data are not sufficient to set an upper limit for (added) sugar intake.

Evidence on the relationship between patterns of consumption of sugar-containing foods and dental caries, weight gain and micronutrient intake should be considered when establishing nutrient goals for populations and recommendations for individuals and when developing food-based dietary guidelines.

The Panel notes that a number of authorities have established upper limits for population average intake or individual intake of added sugars of <10 E% but others have not. Typically, such recommendations reflect a judgement of what level of sugar intake is practically achievable within the context of a nutritionally adequate diet based on known patterns of intake of foods and nutrients in specific populations. It is also noted that the average intake of (added) sugars in some EU Member States exceeds 10 E%, especially in children.

Dietary Fibre

The role of dietary fibre in bowel function was considered the most suitable criterion for establishing an adequate intake. Based on the available evidence on bowel function, the Panel considers dietary fibre intakes of 25 g per day to be adequate for normal laxation in adults. There is limited evidence to set adequate intakes for children. The Panel considers that the Adequate Intake (AI) for dietary fibre for children should be based on that for adults with appropriate adjustment for energy intake. A fibre intake of 2 g per MJ is considered adequate for normal laxation in children from the age of one year.

The Panel notes that in adults there is evidence of benefit to health associated with consumption of diets rich in fibre-containing foods at dietary fibre intakes greater than 25 g per day, e.g. reduced risk of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes and improved weight maintenance. Such evidence should be considered when developing food-based dietary guidelines.

Glycaemic index and glycaemic load

Although there is some experimental evidence that a reduction of the dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load may have favourable effects on some metabolic risk factors such as serum lipids, the evidence for a role in weight maintenance and prevention of diet-related diseases is inconclusive.
 

Keywords
Carbohydrates, dietary fibre, sugars, added sugars, glycaemic carbohydrates, oligosaccharides, starch, lignin, glycaemic index, glycaemic load, dietary requirements, blood lipids, lipid profile, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, body weight,
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77